The Crooked Canes Journal


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Lens Lake Paddle ~ Jul 10, 2014

Journal entry by Donna & Dana Westcott



It was a picture perfect day in the Adirondacks, the temperature was about 75 with a slight breeze to keep the black flies away and the sun sparkled on the water; naturally, we ordered such a wonderful day because we know it was Diane’s big birthday. There were 28 people and 26 boats, another great turnout for the CC’s. Lens Lake is on a tributary of Stony Creek in Warren County, and is used for recreation and flood control, among other things. Construction was completed in 1959. Its normal surface area is 120 acres, and we checked out each nook and cranny and were enthralled by the beautiful white water lilies and lovely vegetation, including “pitcher plants”. It is owned by NYS Dec and Town Of Stony Creek. Thanks to Peter Fedorik for meeting most of the group in Lake Luzerne. Another wonderful day in the Adirondacks.

7/11/14 - Ken Gericke added 10 photos.

7/15/14 - Ray Bouchard added 17 photos.

7/29/14 - Wanderer . added 11 photos.

44 photos



Photo by Donna



Photo by Donna



Lens Lake, a Water Lily Heaven - added by Dana



Birthday Girl - added by Dana



Tom and his new Hornsbeck. - added by Ken



Tom and his sleek new canoe/hammock - added by Ken



Ray Bouchard. - added by Ken



Don.. - added by Ken



Dorothy.. - added by Ken



Lynn.. - added by Ken



Kurt in front of a huge old, snarly blowdown. - added by Ken



More lilies.. - added by Ken



Lilies.. - added by Ken



Along the bog....Lens Lake. - added by Ken



The cavalcade - added by Lynne



Photo added by Lynne



Rose Pogonia (Snake Mouth) is a native orchid frequently found in bogs. Note the lovely crested and fringed lip. - added by Ray



The Common Pipewort (Hatpins) plant also loves an aquatic environment. - added by Ray



A Spatulate Sundew plant with unopened buds on its flower stalk. You can see drops of a sweet, sticky, mucilaginous liquid hanging from the ends of the glandular hairs. The liquid serves to attract, trap and then digest any insect that decides to land on it. Digestive enzymes secreted by the stalked glands break down the protein into units that are small enough to be absorbed by the leaf thus supplying the plant with much needed nitrogen. - added by Ray



Pointing the way, in case you happen to be lost in the maze. - added by Ray



Sheep Laurel - added by Ray



Reflections - added by Ray



Round-leaved Sundew Plants. - added by Ray



A plant known as a Large Cranberry, not to be confused with the more familiar Highbush Cranberry. Note the cranberry with the slight reddish blush signaling that it is beginning to ripen. - added by Ray



Hmmm! Will the spider pollinate this orchid or is it just there looking for lunch, or perhaps both? - added by Ray



A Painted Turtle basking in the ample sunshine. - added by Ray



Blue Damselflies form a mating wheel while propagating their species. The male has the more distinctive blue color. - added by Ray



Unfortunately for this pair of Blue Damselflies, they chose the wrong location for their tryst. By now they have been completely absorbed by the Sundew plant, thus ensuring that this carnivorous plant will survive a little longer. - added by Ray



The yellow blossoms are that of the Horned Bladderwort, another carnivorous plant. Its filament like leaves with their characteristic minute bladders, are submerge either in the water or the mud. One source suggests that when a small invertebrate touches a trigger hair on the bladder, the bladder suddenly opens causing the prey to be sucked in and slowly digested. - added by Ray



Fran and Lynn are busy exploring the backwaters of Lens Lake without a care in the world even though they have come very, very close to hundreds of carnivorous plants. - added by Ray



A Red Winged Blackbird letting everyone know that an intruder is nearby. - added by Ray



A Yellow Pond Lily, also known as a Bullhead Lily. - added by Ray



Alas, even a day as beautiful as this one must come to an end at some point so the decision is made to head for home with a promise to return. - added by Ray



Near the put-in - added by Wanderer



Such a nice day - added by Wanderer



Twins - added by Wanderer



Abandoned beaver lodge - added by Wanderer



Hey - Where did everyone go? - added by Wanderer



Pretty view - added by Wanderer



Singing Happy Birthday to Diane - added by Wanderer



"Sittin on the Dock On the Bay" - added by Wanderer



Lunchtime for the boats - added by Wanderer



Paddling after lunch - added by Wanderer



Mini beaver dam - added by Wanderer



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